Battle Over Digital Books Lead to New York Copyright Lawsuit

September 13, 2011

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Authors' groups and authors have banded together in a federal lawsuit aiming at stopping research libraries and universities from digitizing millions of books, The New York Times reports.

This copyright infringement lawsuit is just another of the many issues going on with digital books. There have been many lawsuits in recent years as products -- such as Amazon's Kindle, Barnes and Noble's Nook and the Microsoft Reader -- jockey for position amid a new wave of reader entertainment.

But as the industry changes, businesses will have to fight for their products, including books that may be changed from print to digital formats and against websites that allow readers to view books they don't own for free, or for a profit. These issues require the experience of a New York Copyright Infringement Lawyer, who will fight the big corporations.

In this case, the lawsuit alleges that by universities digitizing, archiving, copying and publishing the works without authorization, they are "engaging in one of the largest copyright infringements in history." The plaintiffs allege that there are seven million books that are on library servers available for viewing without the authors' permission.

One of the groups, the Authors Guild, also sued Google in 2005, alleging that by scanning and archiving books, the giant company violated copyrights, The Times reports. A judge in March rejected a settlement in that case.

The group of research libraries contends that they have acted lawfully by getting works provided by Google and digitizing them in order to preserve them for future viewing. About 27 percent of the 9.5 million volumes are believed to be open to the public, though the group is worried about security on the library group's servers.

The group of authors also takes issue with the library group's determination of "orphan" works, whose authors can't be determined. The libraries post them online and after 90 days if they haven't been claimed, consider them orphans.

It's issues like these that often require a lawsuit in order to work out the differences between companies and individuals. Small businesses and individuals often feel like they have no way to possibly win.

But our firm believes that you must take risks in order to be successful and you must protect both your property and your intellectual property, which is why we offer contingency business litigation, free of cost unless we win. This is important because many people and small companies can't afford the potentially expensive litigation that comes with these legal matters.

Money shouldn't be a barrier to protecting your legal rights. That's why our firm is committed to fighting for justice in these cases.

The Ferraro Law Firm provides comprehensive legal services, including business litigation on a contingency-fee basis. Call 1-800-275-3332 for a free and confidential consultation. Offices in Miami, Washington, D.C., and New York City.

More Blog Entries:

Company Gets Victory in MP3 Copyright Battle: August 23, 2011

Additional Resources:

Lawsuit Seeks the Removal of a Digital Book Collection, by Julie Bosman, The New York Times